Menu
  • Home
  • Topic
  • 99 Civic LX – How many AC components to replace when metal shavings seen

99 Civic LX – How many AC components to replace when metal shavings seen

Home Forums Stay Dirty Lounge Service and Repair Questions Answered Here 99 Civic LX – How many AC components to replace when metal shavings seen

This topic contains 17 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by coloradotrout coloradotrout 1 year, 1 month ago.

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #894169
    coloradotrout
    coloradotrout
    Participant

    Compressor was making a rattling/beating noise. I replaced it, along with the receiver dryer. The inlet side of the dryer had visible metal shavings, so I think I better replace the condenser. What about the expansion valve on the evaporator? The evaporator? Anything else? I had a shop remove the refrigerant, so it’s empty now. I just need to put the parts back and then take it back to get charged.

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #894172
    college man
    college man
    Moderator

    hopefully the shavings stopped at the drier. Take the line off going to the expansion vale. see if any shavings are there. if none there
    good to go. if present replace the expansion valve.

    #894178
    coloradotrout
    coloradotrout
    Participant

    Thanks. I did only see shavings on the inlet side of the dryer, nothing visible on the outlet side. Do I just pull the line at the firewall and look? Or should I remove the expansion valve itself and look?

    The route is compressor to condenser, to dryer, to expansion valve (with the evaporator), to evaporator, back to compressor. The expansion valve is part of the evaporator assembly under the glovebox.

    Should I use compressed air to blow out the lines from compressor to condenser, condenser to dryer, and dryer to firewall (assuming I see no more shavings beyond that point)?

    #894180
    college man
    college man
    Moderator

    Just pull the line at the firewall. No need to blow anything out at this stage. If the inlet to the expansion valve is clean (firewall) Then the
    drier did its job and stopped the shavings. lets hope

    #894198
    Jake F
    Jake F
    Participant

    Bro, if you have endless money for a ’99 Civic then just replace the entire HVAC. If this is a DIY, avoid the evap/expansion valve, and condenser unless the fins are ruined. Charge it, see if it holds. Get back to us.

    #894200
    coloradotrout
    coloradotrout
    Participant

    Condenser comes right after compressor and costs $47. I will replace it.

    #894214
    coloradotrout
    coloradotrout
    Participant

    No visible shavings at firewall. Using compressed air I blew out the line from dryer to evaparator. Grey oil but no shavings. New compressor, dryer and condenser, new o rings wherever I pulled a line. Oil into those 3 components. I guess now I take to the shop for vacuum and charge. I’m tempted to buy a manifold and vacuum pump, but not sure I would use it again.

    #894218
    college man
    college man
    Moderator

    Sounds good so far. keep us posted how things go.

    #894226
    Billy
    Billy
    Participant

    Gauge manifolds and vacuum pumps can often be borrowed from auto parts stores. If not, gauge manifolds are cheap, and vacuum pumps are cheaper than paying someone to do it for you.

    #894229
    coloradotrout
    coloradotrout
    Participant

    Thanks. Shop quoted me $59 plus R134 to vac down and charge. That is getting down into the territory where its hard to jusify tools.

    #894231
    coloradotrout
    coloradotrout
    Participant

    Good callout ‘relative4’, my O’Reilly has guages and pump. I’ll Google up how or point me to a video please. $20 vs 100 is reason enough to consider.

    I found the ETCG vids; any other tips?

    #894241
    Billy
    Billy
    Participant

    Wow, that’s pretty cheap.

    #894266
    coloradotrout
    coloradotrout
    Participant

    Got guage and vac pump from O’Reilly, two 12oz cans of R134a from Walmart, and the self sealing can adapter from O’Reilly 2nd trip.

    Ran vac for an hour, then let it sit for another hour. No leaks.

    I attached the first can and bled it out at the manifold yellow valve. All vapor so hard to know exactly when, but I hit it for a few seconds. I opened the low pressure side and gently shook and rolled the can with the ac on. It took awhile, maybe 5 to 7 minutes. I was getting some leaks around the connection at the can; just needed to tighten connection. Now the bad news. When i disconnected the can i forget to close off the knob on the manifold. It was a few seconds before i realized and then quickly shut it off. I then attached the 2nd can, emptied it, and disconnected everything correctly.

    It blows 50F with 70 outside and 70 humidity tonight.

    Thoughts? Kicking myself for letting that air in.

    #894269
    college man
    college man
    Moderator

    Sounds like a win. Little bit of a newbie mistake, but you will know next time.

    #894272
    coloradotrout
    coloradotrout
    Participant

    Shall I evacuate and start over? I’m good with that if needed.

    Guages/pump – $0 rental from OReilly
    R134A, 2 x 12oz – $10 Walmart

    Very low cost to try again. If damage to my new compressor, dryer, condenser is likely, I can evacuate and recharge.

    #894273
    Billy
    Billy
    Participant

    It’s fine. The drier is there to catch any traces of moisture introduced by air that gets into unpressurized sections of the gauge manifold during can switches, etc.

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Loading…