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Olds 455 Vs Pontiac 455 Vs Buick 455

Home Forums Stay Dirty Lounge General Automotive Discussion Olds 455 Vs Pontiac 455 Vs Buick 455

This topic contains 34 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by gary w gary w 4 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #661651
    Gary Brown
    Gary
    Participant

    To the people who grew up with these motors, which one of these 455s was the best? The Pontiac 455 is what I’m most familiar with however I have never actually seen a buick or olds 455.

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 34 total)
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  • #661683
    Ryan Wofford
    Ryan Wofford
    Participant

    I didn’t exactly grow up with these motors either but I’ve drivin the olds and the buick. I actually prefer the buick 455, that 455 made that 1972 buick riveria fly! the olds was a a close socond though but I have a feeling it was carb issues making it hold back as much as it did. both were a blast to drive though

    #661739
    Andrew Button
    Andrew Button
    Participant

    Buick. Olds was overstroked. Pontiac 400 always favored engine over 455.

    #661742
    Andrew Button
    Andrew Button
    Participant

    Buick. Olds was overstroked. Pontiac 400 always favored engine over 455.

    #662108
    Gary Brown
    Gary
    Participant

    Ah, good info. Apparently the Buick 455 was also lighter and stronger than the other two from what I’ve read. Andrew, thanks for the block pictures btw. Which one of these is the most expensive to build? I’d imagine the Buick is probably also the most expensive to build?

    #662115
    Andrew Button
    Andrew Button
    Participant

    As a ballpark the Pontiac is the cheapest of the three due to sheer volume and parts interchangablity. There are more good aftermarket parts for the Buick than olds, although yea, they can be costly. Good factory olds stuff like big valve heads and forged cranks are brutally expensive because they didn’t make that many. Last of the super good forged old stuff beginning of 68, first good olds forged stuff was 65… small window of time.. Buick 455s that were setup with better factory parts were more common throughout the 70s. Where as an olds 455 from any year after 70, is well suspect for junky cranks, small valves so that makes Buick a bet in one sense, however that varies with how fast the guy wants to go. In this realm of super fast street motors with semi stock parts Pontiac blows both olds and buick away in terms of all out potential. You may or may not know this, but in the last part of the 70s, a Pontiac transam could be had with either a Pontiac 400 or an Olds 403. No big secret there what was the one to have, although some guys like 403s, they generally blow up. As a side note since you are a chevy guy think about this. Starting in 1970 a guy could get an F body Chevy Camaro SS with a 396 big block, but only in 70 and only a 396. However Pontiac offered a 455 in a Trans Am from 70 all the way through the 70s, but chevy NEVER offered a 454 camaro at any point, Ever. By 73, chevy Camaro was only available with a small valve low compression 350, however that same year, in a Trans Am, Pontiac offered not only a 455, but a really, really nasty 455 with racing pieces that were never before offered in any other pontiac at anytime before or after 73 and 74. My personal thought on this.. well I at one time didn’t not own, but was loaned a 70 Camaro SS with a 396 oval port and a 4 speed, and even with just a little bit of nudging that big rat was painfully fast. Made the 69 Z28 I had just gotten done with look like a joke. So that right there made me realize why a 454 Camaro would have been just to much for the general public and how stock for stock the 454 Chevy made those other 455 engines looked like second stringers. About 25 years ago a friend of mine in the same shop built side by side two motors. I built and Olds 455 and he built a Chevy 402. Everything in that Chevy made my parts look sad. I was intrigued by this, but in reality seeing the differences in the construction there was no way I could have even compared the two motors. The big chevy was superior in every respect. Kinda made me turn Chevy, and I still love Rat stuff, and Olds is nice, and I love them for what they are, but are not Rat chevies and the pontiac and buick are equally sad by way of comparison.

    #662141
    Gary Brown
    Gary
    Participant

    @andrew: Ya the Camaro never had the 454, but the 427, DZ302 and 327 were more than adequate. Pontiac diehards would be hard pressed to put a Chevy motor in their pride and joy, and I respect that. Have you ever been over to the oldsmobile forum? They ostracize anyone who uses anything other than an olds motor in an olds. The rat is the superior motor, however from a purist standpoint, the 455(or any other brand correct motor) is proper per application. I for one, would never tear out a 455 or 400 from a Pontiac and throw a Chevy, Buick or Olds motor in it. That would be blasphemy unless the vehicle was being hotrodded.

    #662148
    Lorrin Barth
    Lorrin Barth
    Participant

    In 1978 I bought a TA with a Pontiac 400. By then not much power. In 1979 I bought another TA because the first one was never in the garage if the wife got there first. This car had an Olds 403. Also, little power.

    The Olds engine was windowed – big holes in the main bearing webbing. I got to see this often enough, the pan gasket would never hold for more than a year or two. Somebody suggested using the heavy duty gasket from the Olds diesel. It still leaked.

    The fuel line on the F-body TA ran along the driver’s side frame rail and the 400 fuel pump was on the driver’s side. The 403 fuel pump was on the other side so Pontiac wrapped the fuel line around the pan. This was when a gas crises was occurring and the gas was loaded with ethanol. The 403 would vapor lock on any hot day.

    #662198
    Gary Brown
    Gary
    Participant

    [quote=”barneyb” post=134948]In 1978 I bought a TA with a Pontiac 400. By then not much power. In 1979 I bought another TA because the first one was never in the garage if the wife got there first. This car had an Olds 403. Also, little power.

    The Olds engine was windowed – big holes in the main bearing webbing. I got to see this often enough, the pan gasket would never hold for more than a year or two. Somebody suggested using the heavy duty gasket from the Olds diesel. It still leaked.

    The fuel line on the F-body TA ran along the driver’s side frame rail and the 400 fuel pump was on the driver’s side. The 403 fuel pump was on the other side so Pontiac wrapped the fuel line around the pan. This was when a gas crises was occurring and the gas was loaded with ethanol. The 403 would vapor lock on any hot day.[/quote] So in other words, the Pontiac engine was superior. Wrapping the fuel line around the oil pan? What were they thinking? Did that vehicle have a return line?

    #662205
    Lorrin Barth
    Lorrin Barth
    Participant

    The Pontiac was superior in the heat with a tank full of ethanol. I remember being out on a secondary road driving the Olds powered rig one day behind a slow semi with just enough room to pass. Half way around the truck with an oncoming truck, the engine decided it would be a good time to vapor lock. Time to test the brakes and handling. They both worked and I lived.

    I also remember that the Olds engine also needed a manifold removal when it sprung a leak. Setting that huge cast iron manifold back in place was 1.5 man job. The Olds engine had a pan under the manifold that I stuck in place with bath tub caulk. This job was done in the early 80’s. That car went to my niece and is still on the road.

    #662227
    Andrew Button
    Andrew Button
    Participant

    Yea, the Olds has what I call a turkey looking pan under the intake…From a power perspective, if were just comparing both engines, yes, they would have been equally crummy, however if you wanted to do bolt ons and such without pulling engines the 403 was just not it, where as low compression pontiac 400 still had some potential if you wanted to removal all the EPA shackles. Here is an interesting factoid, when Smokey and the Bandit was filmed, they used sound effects from Monte Hellmans 55 Chevy Big Block of two lane black top fame, and dubbed them over the pontiac sounds. This to me is full proof that GM ruined any and all their engines by the Disco Era.

    #662249
    Gary Brown
    Gary
    Participant

    [quote=”andrewbutton442″ post=135027]Yea, the Olds has what I call a turkey looking pan under the intake…From a power perspective, if were just comparing both engines, yes, they would have been equally crummy, however if you wanted to do bolt ons and such without pulling engines the 403 was just not it, where as low compression pontiac 400 still had some potential if you wanted to removal all the EPA shackles. Here is an interesting factoid, when Smokey and the Bandit was filmed, they used sound effects from Monte Hellmans 55 Chevy Big Block of two lane black top fame, and dubbed them over the pontiac sounds. This to me is full proof that GM ruined any and all their engines by the Disco Era.[/quote] The sounds were dubbed? Wow…didn’t know that. In reality, all engines got ruined by the EPA junk. The emissions controls strangled power. In any case maybe you can answer this question for me Andrew: Who was the genius who decided to put the distributor on the back of Chevy V8s and why? I respect Ed Cole for what he did for us, surely he couldn’t be responsible for such an annoying design where you have to fight with the firewall to get the distributor cap off?

    #662252
    Andrew Button
    Andrew Button
    Participant

    Why is it in the back ? Ever timed a Ford with a big fan ? I have the emotional scars to prove the distributor belongs in the back. I think it that the camshaft loading is better with in the distributor in the rear….

    #662253
    Gary Brown
    Gary
    Participant

    [quote=”andrewbutton442″ post=135052]Why is it in the back ? Ever timed a Ford with a big fan ? I have the emotional scars to prove the distributor belongs in the back. I think it that the camshaft loading is better with in the distributor in the rear….[/quote] Point taken..point taken. Now I am in agreement.

    #662254
    Andrew Button
    Andrew Button
    Participant

    Chevies always seem to have enough room to get back in there. My Oldsmobile early A body on the other hand, well, thats a different story. Thats about the time that I wish I had a Buick 400, or 440.

    #662255
    Gary Brown
    Gary
    Participant

    [quote=”andrewbutton442″ post=135054]Chevies always seem to have enough room to get back in there. My Oldsmobile early A body on the other hand, well, thats a different story. Thats about the time that I wish I had a Buick 400, or 440.[/quote] A small block chevy yes, a big block on the other hand…not so much. HEI makes it worse. Points have a smaller housing/cap.

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 34 total)

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