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Spring Engine Start Post Winter Storage

Home Forums Stay Dirty Lounge Service and Repair Questions Answered Here Spring Engine Start Post Winter Storage

This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Avatar Richard Kirshy 2 weeks, 6 days ago.

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  • #953041
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    Nathan
    Participant

    Hi all. Apologies if this topic has been discussed (I’m currently not familiar with the forum / searching as of current).

    The back story:
    I’ve been storing my show vehicle each winter for several years now and have had no issues bringing the car out of storage in the spring (annually goes into storage end of October and comes out around mid April). Prior to winter storage (as in a few days before going into storage) the the oil is changed (full synthetic), a full service is done (ALL fluids are routinely changed per schedule – I’m VERY picky about servicing the car), the car receives a full interior / exterior detail, the car spends the winter on jack stands with the wheels removed, the car & jack stands are on top of a tarp on the ground to prevent any moisture seepage out of the concrete, the car is covered and stored in a (non-heated) garage. During the winter, a Battery Tender is used to keep the the battery charged and a battery warmer is used based on ambient temperatures (i.e. if ambient temp drops below 36 F the battery warmer turns on to keep the battery warm).

    The question:
    Even though I have had zero issues starting the car in the spring, I’m always looking for ways to “up my game”, so to speak (I’m an AVID car detailer and I’m always looking to get better / learn new things) and am curious if there are any tips / suggestions on how to best start the engine in the spring. The car is a 2005 Grand Prix / 3800 V6 so the car has a full blown PCM (in later years GM split the PCM out into an ECM and TCM but, for me, I have a PCM). Currently when I start the engine in the spring I do a key-on-engine-off fuel system prime (2-3 times) before starting and then (after confirming all fluids are where they need to be) I start the engine and let it idle for several minutes (at least) before pulling her out of the garage. Once on the road, I am especially careful of keeping RPMs low (I cruise around neighborhoods – 25 MPH speeds – for a while before getting up to highway speeds – 55 / 60 MPH) to allow for engine warm-up. Once on the highway I drive around for a good 30+ minutes allowing the engine to get up to operating temps, fluids to cycle, transmission to have many shifts through all the gears, etc..

    Typically once a year in the fall when I change the oil right before putting the car into storage I will take a sample of the oil and send it to a chemical analysis lab. The reports I get back show the innards of the engine to be running strong but, like I said, I’m always looking for ways to “get better” in my crafts.

    I’m considering adding, to my spring start-up process, where I pull the fuel pump relay, crank the engine 2 – 3 times to allow the oil pump to move oil to the top end of the engine, replacing the fuel pump relay, then doing the 2 – 3 pump primes and then starting. Additionally, for other engines I store during each season I pull the spark plugs, squirt some WD-40 into the cylinder bore and replace the plug.

    Thank you for the input – appreciate it.

    Best Regards,
    Nathan

    • This topic was modified 2 weeks, 6 days ago by Avatar Nathan.
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  • #953050
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    Richard Kirshy
    Participant

    I might suggest if your placing the vehicle on stands that they are located under the control arms to keep the suspension under load and keep it from fully drooping.
    Fully extended suspension, over a time will put stress on bushing etc.
    Other than that, perhaps an under carriage washing before storage.

    #953065
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    Nathan
    Participant

    Good suggestions, thank you.

    #953066
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    Richard Kirshy
    Participant

    One other thought that came to mind …
    Might suggest you coat all the rubber, door gaskets, tires etc. with silicone to help prevent dry rot.

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