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The Basic Parts of an Automatic Transmission

Home Forums Stay Dirty Lounge The EricTheCarGuy Video Forum The Basic Parts of an Automatic Transmission

This topic contains 27 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by Shane Teague Shane Teague 7 years, 6 months ago.

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    Topic
  • #501194
    Eric The Car Guy
    EricTheCarGuy
    Keymaster

    I’ve been wanting to make this video for some time. I’m glad I finally got the chance to bring it to you. I’ll make future videos based on the questions I get about this series so feel free to ask away.

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 27 total)
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    Replies
  • #501374
    Matti Pulkkinen
    Matti Pulkkinen
    Participant

    Wow, that’s pretty complex. Will there be a similar video on manual transmissions at some point in the future? It would be interesting to see how they differ from the automatics.

    #501424
    UnR00ster
    UnR00ster
    Participant

    I found this…

    to be very helpful in figuring out how everything is controlled.

    YMMV, etc.

    #501428
    Steffen Nyegaard
    Steffen Nyegaard
    Participant

    Great video Eric, very educational so far!
    It is easy to see why so many people have issues when they swap out OEM transmission oil with aftermarket oil, even with the same specifications. Everything from viscosity (at all temperatures in the operating range), shear strength, how slippery it is etc. influence both the hydraulic part of the transmission and basic things like the clutch plates, the band etc.
    I have been looking into AW-1 fluid (maybe the same as 3309) which goes into the AWTF-80 SC auto found in volvos, SAAB etc. and also the M1375.4 fluid for specific ZF transmissions and boy are they ultra picky when it comes to the fluids used. It makes much sense now.

    I have a few questions. The clutch plates do indeed look like those on a motorcycle. Do you ever get pitting in transmissions on the bowl (?lacking the correct term) from constant engaging and disengaging? This happens on MC’s which can cause issues with changing gears and weird wear patterns on the clutch plates.

    Also, I have been told that my ZF auto locks above 3000rpm creating a near 1:1 ratio of throttle input vs output and I can really feel that it does not create the familiar slush box feeling where the engine revs but it takes time for the fluids to gain enough momentum to propel the car forward. Do you know how this is done? Is something locking in the torque converter or?

    #501429
    Eric Watrous
    Eric Watrous
    Participant

    Hey EricTheCarGuy, awesome video. I’ve got a few questions that may be worth going over in more detail. With the engaging and disengaging of clutches how does the release of that pressure cause them to disengage? From the looks of it they fit into grooves and can’t shrink or expand so do they move out of the way somehow?
    Also If someone were to add a aftermarket programmer to a vehicle and raise the line pressure to make firmer shifts will this benefit the transmission in the long run or possibly cause more harm than it is worth? Also, I have heard of “pump failure” if the line pressure is too high.. How can a pump fail if it is only two moving gears? Lastly, how does the transmission go about raising line pressure, does it restrict flow to different areas somehow? I understand the concept of how pressure is created (by restriction not the pump) but how does the transmission build up and release this pressure? Thanks for the great videos, Eric.

    #501430
    Logan Johnson
    LJ11194
    Participant

    Well I think I’m going to use my parking brake from now on, after seeing how little is holding the car in place without it…

    #501441
    Darren
    Darren
    Participant

    Great video Eric! I have wanted to thoroughly understand transmissions for a while now especially since my odyssey recently started acting up but I thing I have found the problem, Hooray! anyhow I was so happy when you mentioned the parking break and what locks the tranny in park. I cant wait for the torque converter video! Thanks Eric, stay dirty. btw I am really considering coming to this years meet up, Im 16 and am kind of thinking about getting into the automotive career but I dont quite trust that there will be jobs available in the future. Anyways Thanks!

    #501462
    Aaron
    Aaron
    Participant

    Awesome video Eric 🙂

    #501511
    EricWaterTruck
    EricWaterTruck
    Participant

    Good video Eric! One of the next things on my list is adjusting the bands in my Dakota. It slips from 1st to 2nd a lot and sometimes takes a bit to catch reverse. I have read much about band adjusting and I think it may help in my situation.

    #501536
    Eric The Car Guy
    EricTheCarGuy
    Keymaster

    [quote=”Concurssi” post=50461]Wow, that’s pretty complex. Will there be a similar video on manual transmissions at some point in the future? It would be interesting to see how they differ from the automatics.[/quote]

    In fact I do. Thing is I don’t have one lying around like I did with this one. I could probably pick one up at a salvage yard somewhere. I think it would also be good to cover how Honda transmissions work as well as they are different than traditional automatics.

    #501538
    Eric The Car Guy
    EricTheCarGuy
    Keymaster

    [quote=”Nogood” post=50489]Great video Eric, very educational so far!
    It is easy to see why so many people have issues when they swap out OEM transmission oil with aftermarket oil, even with the same specifications. Everything from viscosity (at all temperatures in the operating range), shear strength, how slippery it is etc. influence both the hydraulic part of the transmission and basic things like the clutch plates, the band etc.
    I have been looking into AW-1 fluid (maybe the same as 3309) which goes into the AWTF-80 SC auto found in volvos, SAAB etc. and also the M1375.4 fluid for specific ZF transmissions and boy are they ultra picky when it comes to the fluids used. It makes much sense now.

    I have a few questions. The clutch plates do indeed look like those on a motorcycle. Do you ever get pitting in transmissions on the bowl (?lacking the correct term) from constant engaging and disengaging? This happens on MC’s which can cause issues with changing gears and weird wear patterns on the clutch plates.

    Also, I have been told that my ZF auto locks above 3000rpm creating a near 1:1 ratio of throttle input vs output and I can really feel that it does not create the familiar slush box feeling where the engine revs but it takes time for the fluids to gain enough momentum to propel the car forward. Do you know how this is done? Is something locking in the torque converter or?[/quote]

    OE fluid is defiantly important in many transmissions. I know Honda’s don’t work right without OE fluid. After my Synthetic vs Regular oil video I’m getting an even better understanding. As for the lock up your talking about that will be covered in the torque converter video.

    #501545
    Eric The Car Guy
    EricTheCarGuy
    Keymaster

    [quote=”EricWatrous” post=50490]Hey EricTheCarGuy, awesome video. I’ve got a few questions that may be worth going over in more detail. With the engaging and disengaging of clutches how does the release of that pressure cause them to disengage? From the looks of it they fit into grooves and can’t shrink or expand so do they move out of the way somehow?
    Also If someone were to add a aftermarket programmer to a vehicle and raise the line pressure to make firmer shifts will this benefit the transmission in the long run or possibly cause more harm than it is worth? Also, I have heard of “pump failure” if the line pressure is too high.. How can a pump fail if it is only two moving gears? Lastly, how does the transmission go about raising line pressure, does it restrict flow to different areas somehow? I understand the concept of how pressure is created (by restriction not the pump) but how does the transmission build up and release this pressure? Thanks for the great videos, Eric.[/quote]

    I might do a video just on clutches at some point to answer that question. I’m seeing it quite a bit in the comments.

    You don’t control pressure electronically. It’s mostly spring pressure that does that. I can cover that more in a future video.

    The harder an automatic transmission shifts, the longer it lasts. This is due to the fact that the clutches slip less as they are applied harshly. More slippage=more wear.

    Remember pumps don’t create pressure, they create volume. If there is a pressure problem look to the things that control pressure not the pump. The pressures are controlled in the valve body for the most part. I’ve been thinking I might just make a video on that at some point.

    #501546
    Eric The Car Guy
    EricTheCarGuy
    Keymaster

    [quote=”EricWaterTruck” post=50543]Good video Eric! One of the next things on my list is adjusting the bands in my Dakota. It slips from 1st to 2nd a lot and sometimes takes a bit to catch reverse. I have read much about band adjusting and I think it may help in my situation.[/quote]

    Bands normally control 2nd gear. I doubt tightening the band would help with your problem. It sounds like you might have an issue with electronics or the valve body. I suppose it could also be leakage in the clutch assemblies.

    #501576
    Steffen Nyegaard
    Steffen Nyegaard
    Participant

    [quote=”EricTheCarGuy” post=50558]

    OE fluid is defiantly important in many transmissions. I know Honda’s don’t work right without OE fluid. After my Synthetic vs Regular oil video I’m getting an even better understanding. As for the lock up your talking about that will be covered in the torque converter video.[/quote]

    Sweet! Can’t wait 🙂

    #501653
    ssewall
    ssewall
    Participant

    THANK YOU for this one! I’ve known the theory behind Auto trans operation for a while but was never able to visualize how all the parts fit together in the case. I always wanted to tear one apart like this but never had the time or transmission.

    #501670
    dave
    dave
    Participant

    Great Video… where were you last semester when I needed you. 🙂

    I gave up my opportunity to tear apart a transaxle in order to do a real life rebuild of a 4L60E. This video was perfect for me to fill in for that missing experience.

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 27 total)

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