Menu

2003 Accord Coupe Rear Brake Pads

Home Forums Stay Dirty Lounge Service and Repair Questions Answered Here 2003 Accord Coupe Rear Brake Pads

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #438690
    WDHewsonWDHewson
    Participant

      Today I renewed the rear brake pads on my 160 000 km Accord Coupe of 2003.

    Viewing 13 replies - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
    • Author
      Replies
    • #438691
      dreamer2355dreamer2355
      Participant

        Ive never heard of those pads either. Did you at least have the rotors cut before you installed the new pads?

        #438692
        WDHewsonWDHewson
        Participant

          Before I bought the “imego ceramic” pads I did a bit of googling, and they are certainly not common. And I didn’t find any commentary that was useful, but brake pads seems to be liked or disliked based on a heavy dose of emotion rather than logic.

          I did not dress the discs as they were perfect.

          Interestingly, the original Coupe’s pads have the word “Findlex” embossed on the steel backing. Findlex was the original name for Nissin in Findlay Ohio, that supplies the Marysville Honda plant.

          For the small amount of braking that is proportioned to the Coupe’s rear brakes, you could probably cut some new pads out of oak and have them last significantly. Joking. Mostly.

          Also, the highest performance feature of this car is its ability to stop, mainly due to its light weight. You wouldn’t believe the way she hauls down.

          Thanks.

          #438693
          EricTheCarGuy 1EricTheCarGuy
          Keymaster

            I would have passed on the rotor machining myself and Honda would agree if you didn’t have any significant damage to them. I’ve never heard of or used those pads so you will be the first to pass a verdict for me.

            #438694
            dreamer2355dreamer2355
            Participant

              Anytime i have completed a brake job, i have always replaced the pads and rotors, usually because the customers vehicle has damage to there rotors such as scoring or pulsation.

              I have also heard and read many manufacturers not agreeing either to replacing the rotors on the vehicle if there not damaged, GM being an example with the TSB # 00-05-22-002.

              For those people who do not cut there rotors, do you roughen up the rotor surface at all?

              Im interested to hear peoples feedback on this one, just out of my own curiosity.

              Thanks 🙂

              #438695
              WDHewsonWDHewson
              Participant

                Thanks guys. A few years ago I read up a bit on pads and rotors, and was interested to find the idea that a significant amount of pad material is transfered to the rotor so that the friction layers are actually pad material on pad material. This seems to be an exxageration to me as the rotors appear to have bare metal exposed with no visual evidence of any layer.

                But my 2003 Accord Coupe’s rear rotors seem to be an exception. The rotor’s friction surfaces were very smooth without any minor scoring and almost look like they were a flat gray color. So maybe pad friction material was transfered.

                For my mind, the most fascinating thing about brakes is that they can disspate all the vehicle’s enormous kinteic energy into heat with very little or no acoustical energy. This is almost like designing a car crash that is silent or a rocket motor that does crackle with sound. Bow to the brake engnieers.

                #438696
                BigCBigC
                Participant

                  Hi dreamer2355,

                  I will be replacing the front pads on my ’94 Camry. The rotors are still in great shape. I plan to grind off the outermost edge of the rotor (very slight rust lip), but that was all. I think after reading your post, I will take some sandpaper and put a non-directional scuff pattern on the rotors….can’t hurt. I am usually a big propponent of replacing pads and rotors together. However, I’ll see how it goes on my own vehicle. Then again, if there are any problems that arise, it is easier to deal with myself than an upset customer. Thanks for the TSB.

                  #438697
                  EricTheCarGuy 1EricTheCarGuy
                  Keymaster

                    The only time you need the non directional surface is when you are installing new or machined rotors. WEHewson is right, there is a layer that is left on by the old pads that the new pads will wear into better than a non directional surface. Keep in mind that a good portion of the friction material is metal so this makes sense. I’ve been just ‘pad slapping’ for years and I’ve found there to be much less break in for the new pads if you just leave the rotor surface alone. I was hesitant at first but after being taught that when I went to Honda school I’ve been doing it that way ever since without incident.

                    #438698
                    WDHewsonWDHewson
                    Participant

                      So far these imego rear pads seem to be fine.

                      But I’ve only got about 2000 km on them so far, and no great emergency stops, or downhill braking.

                      They seem noise free and don’t produce any ugly dust.

                      Hoever, it will really take about a year to get to know these pads.

                      #438699
                      BigCBigC
                      Participant

                        Cool, thanks Eric for the tip. Learned something new. I will go ahead then and skip the extra attention planned for the rotors on my ’94 Camry. They are Bendix rotors and have 42,000 miles on them (mostly highway). I am extremely happy that the Bendix brake pads latest that long too. I will be putting Wagner ThermoQuiet Ceramic brake pads on next. Thanks again.

                        #438700
                        renaudrenaud
                        Participant

                          me i prefer go on the road make a brake test with the pedal and the hand brake after for detect vibration or bump in the car and check the disc thickness-but i fi you do not turn the disc they dont run long after he heat a little bit!!! thats what i thinks and have saw!!! i dont know this kind of pads if there noisy but i f you dont clean the disc after they could make some noise

                          #438701
                          WDHewsonWDHewson
                          Participant

                            BigC:

                            For pad life, no noise, ease on the rotor, and low dust, the Wagner ThermoQuiet Ceramic is the best I’ve encountered.

                            http://www.federalmogul.com/en/AftermarketSolutions/NorthAmerica/BrakingSolutions/Products/BrakePads-Shoes/WagnerPassengerVehicle/Thermoquiet/

                            I see that the link paste problem still exists. Is it only me??

                            They are a little pricey in my Canadian location.

                            #438703
                            WDHewsonWDHewson
                            Participant

                              Thanks for you brake pad update. I’ve got about 2000 km on the bargin imego rear pads and they seem to be performing quite well. No unusual dust or noise. And the pads seem to have bedded in reasonably well.

                              But as you point out, this might be a 9 year experiment.

                              #438702
                              Jason Alexmckrishes
                              Participant

                                I changed my pads a few months ago. It had been 9 years. The rotors were smooth and I didn’t notice any pits or scuffing.

                              Viewing 13 replies - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
                              • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
                              Loading…