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  • in reply to: 2004 Honda Element/CRV Thermostat Replacement #877694
    RereonehundredRereonehundred
    Participant

      Since 1976 with Hondas and Toyotas, I’ve never had to replace a thermostat.

      I’ve always used distilled or deionized water to dilute the antifreeze, and maybe this has helped.

      I’ve gotten lazy about coolant changes, as any time I’ve done one, the sediment the in overflow is nil, and the coolant looks just fine.

      in reply to: 2005 Honda Civic Overheating – 4 shops can’t fix #876135
      RereonehundredRereonehundred
      Participant

        My first overheating trouble shoot was as a kid back in 1969. The cause was highly elusive, and it took me forever to figure it out.

        The coolant pump suction was collapsing the lower radiator hose and circulation was dramatically slowed. But looking things over at idle or engine off, all looked normal.

        Never seen it again though…………………………………better hoses probably.

        in reply to: They Don’t Make Them Like They Used To #876101
        RereonehundredRereonehundred
        Participant

          Summer 2016, I rebuilt the Rochester on a 1957 Chevy with the Blue Flame straight 6 and Power Glide. We went for a ride and suddenly the owner bailed out and went to the passenger door, and then insisted I drive. I slid across the bench seat and took the “helm” At 40 mph I was scared to death. What an ungainly crate!!

          I’ll nominate the Lexus SC 400 Coupe as a future classic. Beautiful skin and beautiful engineering. My friend just bought a good one for $1000.

          Attachments:
          in reply to: 1998 Ford Contour Alternator #FixingItForward #875995
          RereonehundredRereonehundred
          Participant

            Do I see that the new alternator’s pulley has a bent and ragged edge?

            Might this “eat” the edge of the belt and lead to early belt failure?

            in reply to: 2003 Accord Coupe Intermittent HVAC Blower #875570
            RereonehundredRereonehundred
            Participant

              Thanks guys. Eventually intermittent went to “no blow” at all, so I could now test for a failed component.

              The blower motor is strong but the ground switched power transistor controller was faulty. For the Coupe, PN 79330 S6M 941, and $75 from Honda locally.

              See pic of the unit.

              The old Coupe is once again a “blow hard”.

              in reply to: 2003 Accord Coupe Intermittent HVAC Blower #874858
              RereonehundredRereonehundred
              Participant

                Thanks guys.

                The wiring to the motor looks clean and tight with no signs of electrical heat.

                I have noticed that the motor terminals are marked – and +, so I might hook it up to the 12 V battery directly and see if she spools up. This should test the blower motor.

                in reply to: 2003 Accord Coupe Intermittent HVAC Blower #874838
                RereonehundredRereonehundred
                Participant

                  Thanks College Man. I think that the video is right on target.

                  I have located the HVAC blower transistor unit in my car, and it’s very accessible.

                  I could put it through the various tests in the video, but I think it would pass since the blower always operates at start up.

                  Waiting for complete failure might help insure that any part that is bad will actually bench test bad.

                  It’ll probably go bad quickly.

                  in reply to: ETCG’s Top 5 Pet Peeves About Auto RepairCustomers #873730
                  RereonehundredRereonehundred
                  Participant

                    In years of corporate life I’m always surprised how many retail businesses dislike their customers.

                    But those businesses that really appreciate a “paying customer” generally thrive like mad !!!

                    in reply to: New Tires and Wheels #FairmontProject #867040
                    RereonehundredRereonehundred
                    Participant

                      I’ve done some work with aluminum alloy wheel manufacturers. They are finished turned in the bead seating area, so they come of the lathe very true, and the mold is not relied upon for “truth”.

                      Those steel wheels are stampings and are not finish turned. Even if the dies are perfect, the steel has a bunch of residual stresses after the stamping process. So they are a bit less than perfect.

                      in reply to: Rear Brakes the Hard Way #FairmontProject #865335
                      RereonehundredRereonehundred
                      Participant

                        I recognize that mistakes like that are mostly the result of fatigue, not ignorance or stupidity.

                        It’s the reason that some professions and trades mandate rest periods. Locomotive drivers etc……………..

                        in reply to: Installing the New Differential #FairmontProject #864664
                        RereonehundredRereonehundred
                        Participant

                          The last “hop up” I was involved with was an older Camaro. We had no idea of our new HP value, but we were very surprised by how the engine torque and driveline torque down through the tires to the road, twisted the entire Camaro’s body in unanticipated ways. We laughed that we might break the car in half!

                          I think your new engine has much more HP than we did, and I think (guess) that your Fairmont has much less “body” than our Camaro did.

                          So I worry that even with your assorted monocoque reinforcements, when you eventually drop the hammer on that beast, she’ll prove to be susceptible to being ripped apart. But that’s part of the fun too.

                          in reply to: 1993 Toyota Camry V6 Driver’s Kick Panel #863979
                          RereonehundredRereonehundred
                          Participant

                            Hello again with some images.

                            I think the one offered by nightflyer is close if not exact.

                            Here’s two not so good iphone photos of the actual 1993 kick panel. Maybe just one fastener and start pulling.

                            Thanks guys.

                            in reply to: 1993 Toyota Camry V6 Driver’s Kick Panel #863893
                            RereonehundredRereonehundred
                            Participant

                              Thanks for your replies guys.

                              Nightflyer, I think that panel is close but not exactly what I’m dealing with. I’ll take a pic and post it soon.

                              DaFirnz, I don’t believe that this Camry has a connector accessible from the door flex boot. I’ve got to get behind that driver’s kick panel and unplug two multi pin connectors, and then these connectors pull through the grommet hoe in the chassis and the door. I’m pretty sure, but not entirely certain.

                              More later…………………..

                              in reply to: Ford 8.8 Assembly & Set Up #FairmontProject #862265
                              RereonehundredRereonehundred
                              Participant

                                A fine display of persistence. Sometimes it’s our greatest resource.

                                Three things to think about.

                                1. I wonder how they did it at the factory where speed counts for so much?

                                2. For precision machine work, stacked shims must be ultra clean and pressed together hard (more than by hand) to get an accurate thickness.

                                3. Considering the gearbox output forces hitting that “diff,” I’ll bet it all flexes much more than any backlash spec of 10 thou. Steel is more elastic than we think.

                                in reply to: Overbuilding Makes it Awesomer #862134
                                RereonehundredRereonehundred
                                Participant

                                  In today’s world of fuel injection, fuel filtration is really important.

                                  So important, you wouldn’t believe how many times gasoline is filtered between the refinery and your engine.

                                  My wife’s 1999 Honda CRV has got a metal canister fuel filter on the firewall. It’s about the size of two shot glasses. I’ve never replaced it in 400 000 km.

                                  I back washed the filter once onto a clean white paper towel, at about 300 000 km. Nothing came out.

                                Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 377 total)
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